A discussion about Half-Cock in regards to firearms safety.

Also relevant to this discussion – half-cock, by international standards will generally refer to something done with exposed hammer firearms – like a revolver. This is also applicable to many lever-action rifles – where the exposed hammer can be ‘half’ cocked – meaning drawn back only half-way from the down position.

The position of the hammer, when about half retracted and held by the sear, intended to prevent release of the hammer by a normal pull of the trigger. This can be the safety or loading position of many guns.

https://saami.org/saami-glossary/?letter=H

This discussion is intended for a starting point of further discussions about what exactly the term is meant to represent, what it actually represents and its usage in firearms safety.

https://www.milsurps.com/showthread.php?t=59635

I have uncovered some more information about the actual function of the half-cock on an Enfield Mk4 – interesting, yes, it’s actually much closer to an actual half-cock – but has very little at all to do with the position of the bolt. I have also been reading multiple reports where this was highly discouraged – as it wasn’t its intended purpose, and, was known to still fire from that position. I do wonder if they example we talked about in the video is actually a case of this – however, the observation remains – it’s still a very different system and purpose to the half-bolt in modern firearms.

I have also found two videos from an NZ gunsmith (Robbie Tiffen, RIP). I think the issue with these (which show the firearm essentially not firing from ‘half-cock’) two videos are they may not be quite clear if this is a standard or modified action. The second video certainly is (as stated) – the first – not so much. There are definite cases of the round going off from this position in unmodified Tikkas – so is it that some do, some don’t, or, they need to be modified to work this way? Regardless, it’s not something we would recommend.

I also found a document regarding the safety of the Mk4/5 Enfields. Good read.

Writing this article (for me) has also raised more questions again (which I like) – so do expect a series of follow up videos on the idea and concept.